social media campaigns

One of the things that I still don’t like about Facebook Timelines for Business is the way posts by others are grouped in a box, instead of featuring as your own post would.

There is a way of overcoming this, although Facebook has hidden it well! It’s a manual solution, but at least you get to choose which comments to feature in your Facebook Timeline.

Go to your “recent posts by others” box. Hover over a message and a cross will appear in the top right corner. Click on it (go on, be brave – you won’t delete it!) and then click on “allowed on page”.

When you refresh your Page, this update will have magically moved to the left so that any visitors to your page will be able to see it, just as they would one of your own posts.

Go on, try it as soon as you get a new comment!

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Twitter icon
I’ve just been doing some research for a talk I’m giving in a couple of weeks time, and I came accross a blog post dating back to 2008 from Chris Brogan. I was surprised at how relevant it still is, so, bar a few points that I think we’ve moved on from now, I’m going to share it with you…

First Steps

  1. Build an account and immediate start using Twitter Search to listen for your name, your competitor’s names, words that relate to your space. (Listening always comes first.)
  2. Add a picture. We want to see you.
  3. Talk to people about THEIR interests, too. I know this doesn’t sell more widgets, but it shows us you’re human.
  4. Point out interesting things in your space, not just about you.
  5. Share links to neat things in your community.
  6. Don’t get stuck in the apology loop. Be helpful instead.
  7. Be wary of always pimping your stuff. Your fans will love it. Others will tune out.
  8. Promote your employees’ outside-of-work stories.
  9. Throw in a few humans to interact with.
  10. Talk about non-business too.

Ideas About WHAT to Tweet

  1. Instead of answering the question, “What are you doing?”, answer the question, “What has your attention?”
  2. Have more than one twitterer at the company. People can quit. People take vacations. It’s nice to have a variety.
  3. When promoting a blog post, ask a question or explain what’s coming next, instead of just dumping a link.
  4. Ask questions. Twitter is GREAT for getting opinions.
  5. Follow interesting people. If you find someone who tweets interesting things, see who she follows, and follow her.
  6. Tweet about other people’s stuff. Again, doesn’t directly impact your business, but makes us feel like you’re not “that guy”
  7. When you DO talk about your stuff, make it useful. Give advice, blog posts, pictures, etc.
  8. Share the human side of your company. If you’re bothering to tweet, it means you believe social media has value for human connections. Point us to pictures and other human things.
  9. Don’t toot your own horn too much.
  10. Or, if you do, try to balance it out by promoting the heck out of others, too.

Some Sanity For You

  1. You don’t have to read every tweet.
  2. You don’t have to reply to every @ tweet directed to you (try to reply to some, but don’t feel guilty).
  3. Use direct messages for 1-to-1 conversations if you feel there’s no value to Twitter at large to hear the conversation.
  4. Use services like Twitter Search to make sure you see if someone’s talking about you. Try to participate where it makes sense.
  5. 3rd party clients like Hootsuite and make it a lot easier to manage Twitter.
  6. If you tweet all day while your co-workers are busy, you’re going to hear about it.
  7. If you’re representing clients and billing hours, and tweeting all the time, you might hear about it.
  8. Use the URL shortening tool that Hootsuite offers, or one like bit.ly. It helps tidy up your tweets.
  9. If someone says you’re using twitter wrong, forget it. It’s an opt out society. They can unfollow if they don’t like how you use it.
  10. Commenting on others’ tweets, and retweeting what others have posted is a great way to build community.

The Negatives People Will Throw At You

  1. Twitter takes up time.
  2. Twitter takes you away from other productive work.
  3. Without a strategy, it’s just typing.
  4. There are other ways to do this.
  5. Twitter doesn’t replace customer service, but it can complement it.
  6. Twitter’s only a few million people. (only)
  7. Twitter doesn’t replace direct email marketing.
  8. Twitter opens the company up to more criticism and griping.

Some Positives to Throw Back

  1. Twitter works well as an opinion poll. Twitter can help direct people’s attention to good things.
  2. Twitter at events helps people build an instant “backchannel.”
  3. Twitter breaks news faster than other sources, often (especially if the news impacts online denizens).
  4. Twitter brings great minds together, and gives you daily opportunities to learn (if you look for it, and/or if you follow the right folks).
  5. Twitter gives your critics a forum, but that means you can study them.
  6. Twitter helps with business development, if your prospects are online.
  7. Twitter can augment customer service.

 

You can check out the original article here.

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I was interested to read an article in The New Scientist, last week, which recognised how hard it is to accurately predict reliable weather forecasts, and reported on a new weather test which is going to be run by the BBC. More can be read on the weather club website 

The weather affects us all to some degree, whether personally or in business.

  • Shall I take an umbrella?
  • When can I harvest my crops?
  • When shall we display our winter clothing range?
  • Do we need to grit the roads tonight
  • Shall we hold the school fete on the field or in the hall?

So much is planned taking the weather into account, and in social media campaigns we also have to plan around other outside influences.

  • When does my target audience use Social Media?
  • Will Facebook’s EdgeRank share my information with those that I would like to see it?
  • Which social media platform/s is right for my business?

These are only a few examples of questions that need to be answered in order for your Social Media Marketing Campaign to be successful. A good social media manager will seek to find these answers for you, either through experience, research or measuring responses.

If I can be of any help with you social media marketing, please contact me – 01462 615921.

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Someone told me today, that in the Vietnam War, it took over 500 bullets to kill one enemy combatant, but for snipers, the average is 1.3. I guess, one major factor between the two, is the amount of training that a sniper would get. This training in the military, I think can be compared to the preparation that goes into a good Social Media marketing Campaign.

If you fail to plan effectively, and just jump straight in, will you actually achieve your objectives, or, even worse, do you actually know what your objectives are? Yes, it does seem that social media is taking over the world, and if you’re in business, ignoring this could be hugely detrimental,  but is just being “on” social media enough?

It’s quite simple to set up a Facebook Page and a Twitter account, and very easy to publish the odd Tweet or Update, but what’s the point if nobody is listening? As well as keeping your page populated with interesting “stuff” you also need to interact with people and find followers who are interested in your business. Quite simply, if you’re not interested in your potential client, why should they be interested in you?

So, when you’re planning, you need to make sure you have the answers to these questions, and others that will be pertinent to your own business…

  • Who are my potential clients?
  • What are their interests?
  • What will encourage them to engage with me on Facebook / Twitter etc?
  • How can I keep their interest and continue to build my following?
  • What do I want to achieve e.g. sales, more web traffic, to be recognised as The Local Expert etc?

Once you’ve worked out the questions and determined the answers, then it’s time to make a plan and action it. If you’re struggling with any of this, a good Social Media Manager will be able to help you through it and manage your campaign, always keeping your objectives in mind. They can act as an integral part of your team, suggesting ideas and often bringing a wealth of experience and expertise to complement your own.

If you’d like to have a chat to see if I could be the right Social Media Manager for you, just give me a call on 01462 615821.

People often ask me why anyone would hire a Social Media Manager, when they could do it themselves. Running a good, effective, interesting social media campaign isn’t rocket science, but there is more to it than setting up a profile and putting out the odd advertisement tweet. To do it properly takes time, imagination, research and a love of the whole social media scene. Do it half heartedly and you may as well not bother.

I believe that everyone in business has their own talents, and that’s what they should concentrate on. If you’re a really effective financial advisor, then spend your time advising people and making money for your clients and your business. If you’re a creative type, spend your time creating, because you probably hate doing your accounts!

As consumers, we’re quite used to contracting out work. Every time you pick up that takeaway coffee, you’ve outsourced some work. With every pack of pre-washed salad leaves that you buy, you’ve paid someone to do the growing, harvesting, washing, packing, distribution and a lot of other things besides…

Hiring a Social Media Manager is no different to this. A lot of large companies will have a full time social media manager strategising and implementing their social media marketing plan, and ensuring their on-line presence is positive. They recognise that they will be talked about on-line, but if they aren’t a part of this on-line social experience, they don’t have a chance to manage their reputation. Luckily for businesses who don’t want to do this in-house, there are a number of Social Media Managers that you can contract out to.

This expertise doesn’t have to cost the earth. The way I work is to find out about your business and really understand the way your company operates. Although I don’t work in your company, I need to understand in order to be your “voice” on the social media stage. I establish what your business goals are and then work out a plan in order to help you achieve them, within any budget constraints that you have.

If you want to find out more about me to see if we could work together, do have a look around my web-site and get in touch.

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I grew up in the 70’s and 80’s. When I was 14, my brother bought a hand held CB radio and I was instantly hooked! I quickly progressed to a more powerful radio and spent hours and hours chatting to my friends and making new ones. On several occasions I remember chatting to people late at night, only to wake several hours later with just a crackling radio for company – the person I’d been talking too, had given up on me long ago.

But how much better is social media? Instead of being limited to within my hometown (I think rose tinted glasses may be at play here – my signal probably didn’t reach further than a few hundred metres, despite the enormous aerial in my parents back garden!) now the world is your oyster…

We can build relationships with people on the other side of the world, find people that we lost touch with years ago, and link up with people that we don’t yet know, but who have the same interests as us. This is far removed from the random chats with random people that I had on my CB. Some business’s have embraced social media fully, and are reaping the rewards. Others have dipped a toe in and would like to do more, but don’t have the knowledge or the resources. There are of course some who still don’t even have a web-site!

As I’m writing this, it’s occurred to me that some of my old CB friends are also my facebook friends. Who would have thought that friendships forged on the CB would still be going strong some 25 years later!

I wonder what social networking will be like in another 25 years. It quite obviously has a greater mainstream longevity than CB radio. I believe we’re still in the early stages, with many companies yet to engage fully and exploit it to the maximum. The next few years are going to see massive growth, and personally, I’m ready and waiting to ride this roller coaster called Social Media.

One of the questions I get asked all the time is, does social media really work? Can it bring me new customers and more business?

The answer, for the majority of businesses in the UK (there will always be a few exceptions!) is undoubtedly YES!

However, I heard a great story just the other day which really highlights the potential and power of social media. This particular anecdote concerns Twitter.

There’s a very successful UK entrepreneur called Nigel Botterill. Nigel has built five separate million pound plus businesses in the last five years so, he knows a lot about what it takes to build businesses fast. He was one of the first business people to properly understand the potential and power of social media and he has driven literally hundreds of thousands of people to his websites and generated tens of thousands of pounds of revenue directly through social media over the last few months.

However, the story I heard last week is very powerful. Nigel was running a Boot Camp to train potential franchisors, i.e. people that wanted to franchise their business, over two days at his head offices in Solihull. Tickets cost over £2,000 and the event was fully booked.

On the Sunday evening before the event, Nigel put a Tweet out on Twitter that said, “Really looking forward to my Franchisors Boot Camp tomorrow – off for an early night to make sure I’m on top form (hopefully)”.

Now, this is not one of the most insightful Tweets you will ever see(!) but, what happened next is fascinating and illustrates really well the power of Twitter. One “follower” of Nigel is a guy called Jat Mann who runs a business called PC Pal. Jat has recently franchised his business out and when he saw this Tweet from Nigel (at 9.00pm on a Sunday evening don’t forget) it was the first he knew about Nigel’s Boot Camp. He was very keen to get a place so he tweeted back to Nigel asking for more information. Unfortunately, Nigel had gone offline so Jat jumped on the internet and started filling in every email form he could find on all of Nigel’s websites. One of those emails got picked up by one of Nigel’s colleagues who called Nigel at home at 10.15pm on a Sunday evening to ask whether he would accept another person on his Franchisors Boot Camp.

Long story short, Jat turned up at Nigel’s offices on the Monday morning at 8.30am, paid his £2k plus on credit card and joined the Boot Camp.

The point of this story is to illustrate the ability that Twitter has to generate business and, what’s great about this particular anecdote is that it is completely ring fenced, nothing else was at play here – just Twitter.

Now, it would be easy to dismiss this story as an isolated incident – “Oh, Nigel got lucky!” However, that would be to overlook the platform that had been built over the previous months. Nigel has a large number of followers on Twitter and Jat was one of those people. Nigel engages with his audience on Twitter all the time. Consequently, he is seen as being interesting and interested and, so relationships are forged.

When Nigel launches new products or has new initiatives he is able to let his followers know about these things in the right way, at the right time and a heck of a lot of business gets done as a result.

This kind of platform and access to this community is available to you too – IF you use social media properly.

If you need any help in this regard…..then you know where to come!

For sixty years after the Second World War if you were a local business there were only really three things you had to do to market yourself effectively. Life was very straightforward. You took the biggest ad you could afford in Yellow Pages, relied a lot on word of mouth and, if you were very ambitious or a little bit flash(!), then you took an ad out in the local newspaper.

That was pretty much all you had to worry about as far as marketing was concerned.

Oh how times have changed.

Yellow Pages are dying now. They are getting thinner every year, fewer and fewer people are using them and, within the next five to ten years the old printed yellow books will have disappeared altogether.

Right across the country local newspapers are seeing circulation fall and, each month, different titles are shutting down the presses and going out of business.

And, of course, society has become much more transient and mobile than it ever was in the ‘good old days’. Neighbourhood communities are now a real rarity for most people.

For businesses right across the country this has forced a seismic shift in the way they market and promote themselves. New, all encompassing, marketing services like thebestof have come from nowhere to provide a myriad of different services to businesses. The internet is now an integral part of the fabric of modern life and, within that, social media has emerged to fulfil the role of 21st Century word of mouth.

If you think about it, that’s all social media is, word of mouth.

People sharing with other people (some whom they know and others who they don’t know) what they think about things and places, what they’re doing right now and what they are planning to do.

The fact is, that wherever you live in the country, within a few miles of where you are right now there will be thousands of people online, right this minute, on social media sites. Whether it’s Twitter, Facebook or Linked-In, the reality is that these people, in your area, are using social media today. It’s where the people are. And that’s why, if you are a business then you have to be in this space as well and you can’t do it just by buying an ad or writing a cheque.

You have to engage and get involved.

You have to continually update and input.

It’s not difficult and, when you do it right, it can be even more powerful than word of mouth was in the old days because social media allows everybody to communicate with everybody else – and people do.

You don’t really have a choice as to whether you get involved with social media or not – only when. It’s beginning to transform the way people do business in the UK and the opportunities for those businesses sharp enough to see that and adapt to it is immense.

If you would like help with your social media strategy then we’d be delighted to oblige. We understand this stuff, we’re good at it and we love to make it happen. Happy to have a chat – call us on 01462 615821.